Posts Tagged ‘jorge’

Outcome based pricing Exploring an ‘everything as a service’ model

Pricing based on customer outcomes has the potential to turn the buyer/seller relationship into more of a partnership, because both sides are working toward common objectives. The seller is motivated to drive efficiency and positive outcomes – because the more successful the customer is, the more revenue it generates.

Source: Outcome based pricing Exploring an ‘everything as a service’ model | pwc

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Peer-to-peer Lending Loop returns to the market months after being sidelined by regulators | Financial Post

Pastoll said technology and automation are being employed to keep the process from getting too expensive or bogged down with paperwork.

“We’ve created a novel structure that actually allows this business model to operate… It’s still as frictionless as possible,” he said. “A lot of what we’ve been working on is still making sure the process is streamlined and efficient.”

Source: Peer-to-peer Lending Loop returns to the market months after being sidelined by regulators | Financial Post

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In the age of disruption, complacency is an investor’s biggest enemy

The difference today is that it no longer takes 30 years for an innovation to become disruptive. Take for example the roll out of Airbnb and its impact on the hotel industry; Uber’s low-cost ride sharing, which will soon make city controlled high-cost taxis obsolete; Amazon’s online business, which is threatening higher cost big-box retailers such as Best Buy; and streaming services such as Spotify and Netflix, which are making CDs and DVDs a thing of the past.

Source: In the age of disruption, complacency is an investor’s biggest enemy

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Disrupting Industries With Cognitive Computing

With cognitive computing, we are now able to unlock the value in ALL the data — from internal, external and even publicly available sources — available to a business. Much of this data was previously inaccessible as it existed in was unstructured (documents, emails, social media posts and images etc.), or was dispersed among any many systems and silos. Hear how two companies are already using cognitive computing to disrupt their industries:

Source: Disrupting Industries With Cognitive Computing

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Digital Transformation Going Mainstream in 2016, IDC Predicts – The New York Times

Many of these companies, according to IDC, are not moving fast enough. It predicts that a third of the top 20 companies in every industry will be “disrupted” over the next three years, meaning their revenue, profits and market position will deteriorate — not that they will go out of business.

Source: Digital Transformation Going Mainstream in 2016, IDC Predicts – The New York Times

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Is the Life Expectancy of Companies Really Shrinking? – Only Dead Fish

It’s difficult to navigate through all the myriad factors to identify what might really be behind this picture, but perhaps the real story is less about the impending death of large businesses and more about their need to adapt – to move through business and product life cycles more quickly than before, to be more focused on systematic experimentation and organising swiftly around opportunity.

Source: Is the Life Expectancy of Companies Really Shrinking? – Only Dead Fish

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Low-End Disruption in Consumer Markets | Tech-Thoughts by Sameer Singh

In the 1960s, General Motors held a ~50% share of the US automobile market and 80% of the industry’s profits. General Motors’ integrated value chain allowed it to dominate the industry in an era where products were still not “good enough” (with respect to performance and reliability). But as automobile performance improved, modular, “low-end” disruptors like Toyota attacked it from below and profits evaporated. Toyota did not succeed by immediately attacking the premium segment of the market. It started with the low-end Corona and “then moved up-market by introducing sequentially its Tercel, Corolla, Camry, Avalon and 4-Runner models, and ultimately its Lexus”. Honda and Nissan followed similar approaches to disrupt integrated incumbents like General Motors, Ford and Chrysler. Now, these disruptors are in turn facing low-end disruption from the likes of Kia and Hyundai.

Source: Low-End Disruption in Consumer Markets | Tech-Thoughts by Sameer Singh

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