Favorite Reading List

My blog is more of a collection of favorite reads that contribute to my business model than rants and raves. But there may be a few 🙂

In general you can ignore the “Read More” link and simply click on the source link.

Enjoy!

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Following a Tuna from Fiji to Brooklyn—on the Blockchain | WIRED

Gopinath says he sees two major hurdles to bringing blockchain technology to supply chains—and neither of them have to do with the tech itself. The first is simply convincing everyone in the supply chain, which can involve dozens of companies, that switching to a new system is a good idea. “You’ve got to make sure that everybody in the ecosystem gets something out of it,” says Gopinath. “That is very hard and it takes a long time to figure out.”

The second problem is governance. Because blockchains aren’t centralized, it’s difficult to decide how they should be managed. “Who can use the data? Who can see the data? Who can do analytics on the data? Can they share the data? All of these questions have to be answered to the satisfaction of the ecosystem,” says Gopinath. It’s likely going to take years to solve these issues and to square them with government regulators. If someone says that they can be solved in six months, “I’ll just laugh at them, because it’s not going to happen. You can just tell them, sorry, I’m just not going to believe you,” says Gopinath.

Source: Following a Tuna from Fiji to Brooklyn—on the Blockchain | WIRED, Louise Matsakis, May 22, 1018

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BMW, Ford, GM: World’s Largest Automakers Form Blockchain Coalition – CoinDesk

What is required to move those forward, he said, is a decentralized business network.

“You really have to have common standards and common ways for cars to communicate, to identify themselves and make payments,” Ballinger told CoinDesk, adding:

“But if each auto company is trying to develop its own car wallets or its own way of paying tolls, or providing a ride sharing service, it just doesn’t work; it’s the Tower of Babel.”

Dan Harple, the CEO of Context Labs, who is working closely with Ballinger, said the new consortium’s first step will be to establish a “minimum viable ecosystem” for gaining network effect.

Source: BMW, Ford, GM: World’s Largest Automakers Form Blockchain Coalition – CoinDesk, Ian Allison, May 4, 2018

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This is a Private Blockchain

This is a private blockchain. Some people may try and tell you your competitors will see all your business transactions. They might scream about your suppliers and your costs, your customers, and their special pricing. They might say it in front of your board of directors. You might even start to believe that everything is in public view. But it’s not true. This is Hyperledger Fabric. Bring your Q&A to Startup Breakfast Club.

Inspired by CNN’s Facts First

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This is a Public Blockchain

This is a public blockchain. Some people might try and tell you it does not work without Bitcoin. They might scream Bitcoin, Bitcoin, Bitcoin over and over and over again. They might say it in front of the House of Commons. You might even start to believe that you need Bitcoin. But it’s not true. This is Ethereum. Bring your Q&A to Startup Breakfast Club.

Inspired by CNN’s Facts First

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IBM introduces a blockchain to verify the jewelry supply chain | TechCrunch

“Now we can share this [data] in a permissioned network and we can be sure it’s accurate,” he (Jason Kelley, the GM of blockchain services at IBM) said.

The notion of the permissioned blockchain is an important one here. It means that you have to be allowed on the blockchain to participate, and everyone on the blockchain has to agree to let any members on. “That’s what exciting with TrustChain. Each point in the supply chain has bought into the consortium,” he said.

Source: IBM introduces a blockchain to verify the jewelry supply chain | TechCrunch, Ron Miller, April 26, 2018

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How blockchain could solve the internet privacy problem | Computerworld

“I don’t believe there’s a ton of people who are suddenly going to wake up this summer and say, ‘I need to download a self-sovereign identity wallet for my phone,’ ” Windley said. “What’s more likely to happen is they’re going to go into their bank or credit union and they’re going to say, ‘We have this new way of logging into your account.’ You’ll download an app.”

Behind the scenes, the bank and customer will exchange non-correlatable identifiers; they’ll simply scan a QR code and will be signed up for the new identity service.

“Later on, they’ll see that as an [icon] on their phone,” Windley said.

Source: How blockchain could solve the internet privacy problem | Computerworld, Lucas Mearia, Computerworld | April 9, 2018

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